HOW IPHONE X FACE DETECTION CAN BE USED AGAINST YOU

November 7th, 2017 Posted by thoughts, Updates No Comment yet

There are tons of personal biometric data that can identify a person – his voice, heartbeat patterns, gait, retina, the list goes on. Ever wondered why a $500B rich company, that can afford virtually any technological whim, out of all the possible options chose… face recognition? Why, why the face?

Apple’s brand new tech is essentially simple – a person’s face (according to the scanner it’s just a volumetric shape) is scanned with 30000 infrared dots which are then used to build a mathematical model that uniquely identifies the person. In the tech description Apple swears that this model is stored exclusively on the device and is not shared with any third party, let alone special agencies. However, app developers enjoy free access to this technology, and thousands of developers are already upgrading their apps to employ the Apple’s facial identification API.

There are tons of personal biometric data that can identify a person – his voice, heartbeat patterns, gait, retina, the list goes on. Ever wondered why a $500B rich company, that can afford virtually any technological whim, out of all the possible options chose… face recognition? Why, why the face?

Of course, app developers are required to inform the happy iPhone owners what data is used and what for, and this is where it gets interesting. A human’s face has 57 muscles, some of which are paired. Apple’s face scanner can detect even the slightest muscle twitches in real time and it’s what you gotta do if your sole aim is to identify a person. But as the wonderful movie “Inception” claimed, we need to go deeper. There is that science boasting a thousand year old history that is called “Psychology”. Those who saw the “Lie to me” show (I’m on a pop culture reference rush) are aware of the fact that even the most insignificant eyeball movements, pupil size, lip twitches and a whole slew of uncontrollable mimics can tell a whole lot about a person. A trained FBI agent can easily tell if the subject is lying, if he’s agitated or depressed all by reading and analyzing these little details. Do you really think that app developers will tell that to your non tech-savvy mom when they request access to her facial data?

A trained FBI agent can easily tell if the subject is lying, if he’s agitated or depressed all by reading and analyzing these little details. Do you really think that app developers will tell that to your non tech-savvy mom when they request access to her facial data?

Or tell her that real-time face monitoring can identify the person’s psychological type with great accuracy, in other words tell if he’s a sanguine or a choleric, if he’s extraverted or introverted or, in gamers terms, a scavenger or a hunter. Is he ready to buy ‘that very best something’ or he should first be first asked a couple of tailored personal questions that will melt his attention? Is he the working man of the house or he’d rather go read a book. Even who is he for: Trump or Putin. That’s right, democracy says “Hi” 🙂 But the most important is that at any time you are looking at the screen, your iPhone will know if you are really lying or just want that moist cake on the picture. A pocket polygraph combined with a leash that is. And where is a leash, one can be sure that a carrot and a whip are nearby.

The carrot is already there – psychotype identification can skyrocket efficiency of context ads. Your personal psychological traits matched with your search history and purchase history will enable making extremely personalized ad texts that work exclusively for you. I’ve spoken to my contacts in Apple and Facebook and they didn’t even try to convince me of the opposite. Today face scanning is used in a naive feature – passwordless authentication. In 2019, or should I say in 1984, your brains will be scanned through that very iPhone screen. Go read Orwell’s masterpiece if you haven’t already, it might plant a few interesting thought into your head.

Alexander solzhenitsyn once said that the freedom of a man is determined by how much the government doesn’t know about him. This guy tasted the totalitarian regime at it’s best, so he knows what he’s talking about. I didn’t, but I can’t remind enough to the application developers and everyone around me: “The road to hell is paved with good intentions”. If you are making a nuclear bomb, it’s silly to shy away from photos of Hiroshima and deny thoughts of its future usage.

Maybe I’m exaggerating, but I’m saying what’s on my mind. If you have an opposite opinion, you’re welcome to the comment section unless you’re a troll.

P.S. Please share and repost, together we can make a change!

P.P.S. Apple’s first ad was mocking the “1984” philosophy. In 2017, long after Steve Jobs died, the company made a one-eighty turn. Isn’t it ironic? 

 

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